The Challenge and Value of Research in Emergency Medicine: at DGINA 2014

Presentation (1)

On 7th November this year I was hugely honoured to give two invited talks at the annual conference of the German national society for Emergency Medicine – DGINA 2014 in Nuremberg.  This conference was organised by an awesome team of emergency physicians from Germany led by Michael Christ, author at the amazing DGINA blog.   If you haven’t found this blog yet, check it out.  It’s in German but there’s a handy translation tool on the right side bar in case (like me) you can’t speak the language.

DGINA

I was really keen to support DGINA 2014 because Emergency Medicine is a developing specialty in Germany and is facing home huge challenges.  While many hospitals now have Emergency Departments that see undifferentiated patients, the specialty of Emergency Medicine isn’t yet formally recognised in the country.  Physicians train in another specialty – for example Surgery, Anaesthetics or Internal Medicine – and then work in the Emergency Department.  On the evening I arrived at DGINA, Michael Christ let me know that, albeit in Berlin only, they have just had the great news that Emergency Medicine will at least be recognised as a subspecialty for the first time.

The first of my two talks at DGINA was on the Challenge and Value of Research in Emergency Medicine.  This is a call to arms, really – an effort to inspire people to consider doing research in Emergency Medicine.  Hopefully it will touch at least one person to help us to do research and to help us to achieve a better evidence base for the vital emergency care that we give every day.  In this talk I told the story about why I do medicine and why I do research.  When I chose to specialise in Emergency Medicine, I actually had no intention of following an academic career.  If you want to find out why I did, what it’s done for me and what I think it can do for you and future generations of emergency physician, please check out the slides and the podcast below.  I hope you enjoy it.

 

Here are some references from this talk:

First, and most importantly, there’s a little quip in my talk about converting GB pounds to Euros.  This isn’t my creation.  All credit for that goes to our fantabulous Natalie May, who presented a similar conversion in her talk on SMACC at EuSEM 2014!…

Here’s a link to the DGINA blog

And here are the other references…

The paper that Simon and I wrote (with our awesome team) on the value of risk factors for diagnosing acute myocardial infarction

The Best BET I wrote with the amazing Kerstin De Wit (nee Hogg) on the use of oxygen in acute myocardial infarction.

Rick

Posted by Rick Body

Professor Richard Body MB ChB, FRCEM, PhD is Professor of emergency medicine in Manchester. He is honorary Consultant in Emergency Medicine at Manchester Foundation trust. He is also the director of the Manchester Diagnostics and Technology Accelerator (DiTA) and Research Director of the Emergency Medicine and Intensive Care Research Group (EMERGING). His research interests include diagnostics, cardiac disease and the philosophy of emergency medicine. He is an acclaimed international speaker on cardiac diagnostics . He can be found on twitter as @richardbody

  1. An Amazing inspiring talk Rick paves the way for easy -access into research!

    Reply

Thanks so much for following. Viva la #FOAMed

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