Tag: head injury

September Round Up Podcast

Welcome to our audio round up of everything on the blog during September. It’s been a relatively quiet on the blog post this month, but we chat through not only blogposts on the REMAP-CAP trial,

Lesson Plan – Head Injury

References and Further Reading The Assessment of Orientation Following Concussion in Athletes Maddocks D, Dicker G, Saling M. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine (1995) The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 5th Edition (SCAT5) Echemendia R, Meeuwisse

JC: TXA in severe head injury. St Emlyn’s

Our post on the CRASH-3 trial, an RCT examining the use of TXA in head injury, was arguably our most controversial of 2019 (1). Our view was that the evidence was not entirely definitive, but

CRASH-3

JC: Tranexamic Acid (TXA) in Head Injury. The CRASH-3 results. St Emlyn’s

St Emlyn’s had sight of a pre-publication copy of the CRASH-3 trial from the trial team. This allowed us to prepare this blog in advance of publication. The trial authors have not been involved in

How to manage your boss (the expert patient in the ED). St.Emlyn’s

This is another guest blog from our friend and colleague Andy Volans, Consutlant in Emergency Medicine.   We’ve all been subjected to the challenge of the “Expert Patient”. Our GP colleagues probably get it more

JC: Impact Brain Apnoea. St.Emlyn’s

I’ll keep this post brief. This is not a critical appraisal and it’s not a review. It’s an invite to read a paper I was honoured to help write on the subject of Impact Brain

JC: Salt or Sugar? Hypertonic saline for head injury at St.Emlyn’s.

‘Why did you give Mannitol?’ asked the Registrar. ‘Hypertonic saline was the standard of care for head injury at St.Elsewhere and I was told it reduced mortality’. OK, so that’s a paraphrased recollection from some

JC: EuroTHERM or EuroBURNED. St.Emlyn’s

October has been a stellar month for publication of critical care trials in high impact journals. SPLIT, HEAT and FELLOW have already been FOAMed all over, but that left me with a still tempting choice

Impact Brain Apnoea with Gareth Davies from London HEMS. St.Emlyn’s

I was recently discussing the management of traumatic cardiac arrest with one of my junior colleagues and was surprised to hear that they had not heard of impact brain apnoea as a cause of respiratory

JC: Progesterone’s pleiotropic failure in head injury. St.Emlyn’s

Pleiotropic might just be my favourite new word, thus overtaking November’s great word ‘Glyptotek’ (Danish for Sculpture museum). I digress. Pleiotropic is a word used to describe the ability of a gene to affect multiple


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