Tag: CMP2

European Resuscitation Council meeting: Slovenia 2019. St Emlyn’s

This month I was lucky enough to be invited to speak in Slovenia at the European Resus Council meeting. It was a super place to visit and a wonderful conference. The theme of the conference

Mcgrath vs macintosh laryngoscopes

JC: Macintosh vs. McGrath laryngoscopy in pre-hospital care.

There has been an ongoing debate about the use of video laryngoscopy (VL) in emergency and critical care​1–4​. Proponents speak of the better visibility and ability to teach using video systems whereas those preferring a

JC: Should we use chest compressions in traumatic cardiac arrest? St Emlyn’s

This is a question that we’ve addressed on the blog before and the evidence has been a little conflicting​1–6​. From a pathophysiological perspective the logic of using closed chest compressions in a patient who has

JC: Can HEMS improve patient outcome in Traumatic Cardiac Arrest? St Emlyn’s

This week we are briefly looking at an interesting paper that suggests that HEMS services have much to offer in the management of traumatic cardiac arrest (TCA). We know that outcomes from TCA are poor,

JC: Do you see the light? Serum neurofilament light chain for prognostication following OOHCA

I’ve been meaning to do a blog on this paper for some time now. Paul Young, who’s opinion I have a lot of time for, seemed clearly excited about its release. And in December at

#stemlynsLIVE #FOAMed

Beyond A(C)LS. Salim Rezaie at #stemlynsLIVE

Ed – This blog is based on the talk Salim gave at #stemlynsLIVE in Manchester back in September 2018. The background and data below was first published on the REBEL EM website and is reproduced here

JC: OOHCA and Airway management. Do we need a tube? St Emlyn’s

  If out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and outcome data is the topic, long is the list of research and passionate is the debate on every possible measurable outcome from pit crew CPR to methodology of compression

JC: Does Epinephrine work in Cardiac Arrest. St Emlyn’s

Epinephrine use in cardiac arrest is controversial1,2. Despite patho-physiological arguments3,4 that it can improve brain perfusion and even that it may improve the rate of ROSC (Return of Spontaneous Circulation) many have expressed the concern

JC: Oxygen in the Acutely Unwell Patient. St Emlyn;s

When I started in medicine all resuscitation started with some form of supplemental oxygen. Whether that was by face mask, LMA or intubation, oxygen was the mainstay of initial treatment and you would even fail

Podcast: September 2018 round up of the St Emlyn’s blog

Here’s the September podcast round up of the St Emlyn’s blog. For some reason this did not get published back in 2018, so here it is now 🙂 The following blogs are discussed. OOHCA and

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