Category: Emergency Medicine

October round up podcast. St Emlyn’s

Our regular round up of the October 2021 content from the blog and podcast at St Emlyn’s with Iain and Simon.

JC: Can we use smaller pigtail drains in traumatic haemothorax?

Back in 2016 we published a blog on chest drains and chest aspiration, in which we argued that the dogma of putting in huge drains for traumatic haemothoraces should be questioned. The dogma of using

Learning from airway management in the ED: UK Perspective

This is the transcript for an invited talk at the recent Difficult Airway Society (DAS) 2021 virtual conference. It was lovely to be invited and great of the organisers to create a multidisciplinary opportunity for

#EuSEM21 The power of stories in Emergency medicine education revisited.

This week I was lucky enough to attend the European Society of Emergency Medicine conference in Lisbon in person. It has been a wonderful experience to once again reconnect with people face to face. Since

Cardiac output as a metaphor for flow through an urgent care setting

Flow through the urgent care setting, such as an emergency department (ED) is complex. There are a multitude of factors that affect flow through an urgent care setting. Systems research has shown that it is

Highlights from the Virtual Colloquium – 14th Annual Update in Paediatric Emergencies Day 2

This post follows my notes from Day 1 of the Virtual Colloquium – 14th Annual Update in Paediatric Emergencies. Day 2 was another mixed bag of talks, from paediatric analgesia and sedation, to the philosophy

Cauda Equina

JC: Re-evaluating risk factors for Cauda Equina. St Emlyn’s

The diagnosis of cauda equina in the emergency department is complex and has the potential for significant patient harm if we get it wrong. Linda Dykes put together an excellent infographic on this back in

Highlights from the Virtual Colloquium – 14th Annual Update in Paediatric Emergencies Day 1

It’s been a long time since I’ve been at a conference, either in-person or virtually. Something that was once a regular part of my professional life has, like so many things, become a distant memory.  

JC: The REST trial. St Emlyn’s

Some years ago I remember speaking to a rather well known intensivist who was advocating for the extracorporeal removal of CO2 in ICU patients. His logic was that in patients with hypoxic lung failure we

CTCA

JC: CTCA for cardiac chest pain in the ED. St Emlyn’s

Computed Coronary Angiography (CTCA) has been advocated as a useful adjunct in the investigation of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) in the ED. Although we’ve made huge progress in the diagnosis of ACS through the use

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