A decade in review for Emergency Care. St Emlyn's

I hope you’ve had a very happy Christmas/holiday period, and that work hasn’t been too intense for you. As we close out 2019, we’re looking forward to a new decade of Emergency Medicine here in Virchester. That being so, our team has put together a mini-series of short blog posts for you. We’re going to review some of the amazing progress we’ve made in our specialty over the last 10 years, and look forward to the incredible progress that the next 10 years might bring.

Here are the posts we’ve put together – you can start browsing right away from here. We hope you enjoy them!

A decade of the ACP in Emergency Care

Rusty reviews the rise of the Advanced Care Practitioner role in our specialty.

A decade of diagnostics in Emergency Care

In 2010 I’d just finished my PhD, researching ways to avoid those long 12-hour waits for serial troponin tests. As 2020 begins, that seems about as out-dated as using venesection to treat sepsis. How did we get here, and how has our thinking about diagnostics evolved? In this post I review our progress.

https://www.stemlynsblog.org/a-decade-of-diagnostics-in-emergency-care/(opens in a new tab)

And, coming soon, we hope to have the following delights for you!…

A decade of education in Emergency Care

Who better than Ross Fisher to review the evolution of our ability to educate our fellow professionals? Just think how far we’ve come – 2010 seems light years ago!

A decade of progress for gender equity in Emergency Care

Natalie May reviews the progress we’ve made in developing family friendly conferences and gender equity in our specialty.

A decade for staff wellbeing in Emergency Care

In 2010 I’d never heard of any initiatives designed to help staff with their wellbeing. With the growing intensity of our work and the huge incidence of burnout among emergency physicians, it’s now an essential part of our working lives. Liz Crowe takes a look at all the progress we’ve made.

Happy New Year, and Happy New Decade, from all of the St Emlyn’s team! Let’s hope that the 2020s are very happy and successful for us all.

A decade of #dogmalysis

There are many things that were dogma back in 2009 that are heresy today. Simon will look back at how dogma changes, and why we should be as uncertain about our practice today as we were back then.

A decade of clots

Dan Horner is our resident clotologist. SO much has changed in the last 10 years on diagnosis, DOACs and dilemmas. Dan will bring you back up to speed on where we are now and perhaps where we go next.

Training is just the same

Except it’s not. Differentiation, specialisation and regionalisation have impacted on who, where and how we train the next generation.

ATLS is Schrodinger’s cat

Everything has changed in trauma, but yet it’s still taught the same as it was 10 years ago. Something is not quite right in the world of trauma training. ATLS seems to be both alive and dead, depending on whether you’re prepared to ask the right questions.

Rick

Posted by Rick Body

Professor Richard Body MB ChB, FRCEM, PhD is Professor of emergency medicine in Manchester. He is honorary Consultant in Emergency Medicine at Manchester Foundation trust. He is also the director of the Manchester Diagnostics and Technology Accelerator (DiTA) and Research Director of the Emergency Medicine and Intensive Care Research Group (EMERGING). His research interests include diagnostics, cardiac disease and the philosophy of emergency medicine. He is an acclaimed international speaker on cardiac diagnostics . He can be found on twitter as @richardbody

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