Tag: SLO3

JC: The RePHILL trial. St Emlyn’s

This week we see the publication of the RePHILL trial. This is something we have been looking forward to for some time. A randomised controlled trial of the use of packed red cells, LyoPLAS and

JC: Pre-hospital thoracotomy – what can we learn? St Emlyn’s

Resuscitative thoracotomy remains a controversial procedure in prehospital and emergency care. This month we have more evidence of its effectiveness in prehospital care. Despite significant advances in trauma care, we are still challenged with moving

JC: Etomidate vs. Ketamine for emergency intubation. St Emlyn’s

Just a quick review this week as this is a paper published back in December that has been superbly reviewed already over on the SGEM. However, it’s an interesting topic and one that has been

JC: Should we use calcium in out of hospital cardiac arrest? St Emlyn’s

A trial published in JAMA asks exactly this question, the full text can be found here. The abstract is below, but as we always say, please read the full paper yourself. Previous studies have shown

JC: Are CT scanners getting more sensitive at detecting SAH? St Emlyn’s

JC: Are CT scanners getting more sensitive at detecting SAH? St Emlyn’s

There is no doubt that sub-arachnoid haemorrhage is an important diagnosis in the emergency department. It is arguably especially important in the cohort of patients who present with lesser signs/symptoms as they are the group

JC: More on pulse oximetry and racial bias. St Emlyn’s

This week we are reviewing a paper on the accuracy of pulse oximetry in patients being assessed for ECMO. This is an interesting group as they represent and extremely unwell group of patients where small

Top 10 Trauma Papers for Trauma UK conference. 2020-2021. St Emyln’s

It’s that time of year again when the Trauma Care UK conference comes around and I get to talk about 10 interesting trauma papers from the last 12 months or so. This is a regular

JC: The BASICS trial. 0.9% saline vs balanced solution. Does it matter?

I’ll admit that my long term clinical practice has been to prefer balanced solutions (in my case Hartmans) over 0.9% saline in the management of the critically ill patient. It’s a topic we’ve blogged and

targeted temperature management

JC: The TTM2 trial. Normothermia or hypothermia post cardiac arrest.

A quick update on an TTM2 trial published in the NEJM last month. As part of the chain of survival it’s important to optimise the post resuscitation phase, primarily to preserve neurological function as this

Big Shock…..Do we ❤ POCUS?

‘Red Standby 4 mins’ tannoys the nurse in charge. ‘It’s a 70yr old male BP 68/49, pulse 120, GCS 14/15, O2 sats 98% on 15L NRB, temperature 37.5°C’ you are reliably informed by a colleague.

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