Tag: CC5

Emergency Medicine, a risky business Part 5. Does a correct diagnosis mean that the therapy will work?

Emergency Medicine: A risky business part 5. Does a correct diagnosis mean that the therapy will work? In the previous post in this series around diagnostics we have looked at how the performance of most

Perimortem C-section at St.Emlyn’s

There are a few blog posts that seem to stick in the mind more than others, and certainly ones that I direct colleagues back to on a regular basis. One of these for me (and

JC: Gut feeling about serious paeds infections

So, I am back to rainy Northern England after my exotic travels to Cameroon and Gran Canaria (note: I still managed to join Twitter JC every Friday!) to find a paper on my desk for

St.Emlyn's

Emergency Medicine: A risky business Part 4

Welcome back to the 4th part of the series looking at understanding risk and diagnosis in Emergency Medicine. In part 3 we looked at how tests with apparently high sensitivities (e.g. 98% sensitivities) actually mean

Emergency Medicine, a risky business Part 3. How often is it acceptable for me to be wrong?

Emergency medicine is a risky business. In this continuing series looking at how we as emergency physicians look at risk we are going to spend a bit of time looking at how we feel about

What’s your NNT? St.Emlyn’s

How would you estimate your personal NNT as an Emergency Physician?

Emergency Medicine, a risky business part 2.

How to consider thresholds for labelling in the diagnostic process. Diagnosis does not guarantee treatment success or failure.

EKG in inferior myocardial infarction

Emergency Medicine, a risky business part 1. You are not a diagnostician.

Time to think about whether you are really an emergency medicine diagnostician… Are you a diagnostician? Of course you are! Why do I even need to ask? Well, to be honest I’m no longer very

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The time bomb of doom: What I think about when I’m tending broad beans

The dilemmas and difficulties of diagnosing Aortic dissection in the emergency department. Differential diagnosis. Early investigation and management.

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Superficial Venous Thrombosis: watch and wait or anticoagulate?

Check out our ICEM poster on this. So, I see this old chestnut is under discussion again. A couple of us from the EmergINg team brought a poster to ICEM on this very topic. Sure you’ll all


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